Mattress Vancouver

Simmons Mattress Gallery's Blog

The Top Ten Signs Summer is Coming to Vancouver

10. Border lineups

Better tack on an extra two hours for your trip to Seattle this weekend. It’s crazy to think that Europeans can travel between countries with hardly any thing more than a signpost.

9. The roof is off

The $560 million roof is retracted at BC Place. Wait. Was that a raindrop? Better close it back up.

8. English Bay is packed

Did you know that the smiles on the Laughing Men extend two centimeters when the temperature gets above 20° Celsius. Fact!

7. No one is bitching about the Canucks

The city takes a two-month break from whining about our beloved Canucks. Sleep now Trevor; the honeymoon is coming to an abrupt end.

6. Gas prices are ridiculous

As soon as people start to abandon their cars for walking or riding to work, the government jacks the gas prices. Well, that’s our theory. Don’t hold us to it.

5. Stan from accounting is talking about his Grind time

Let’s all stand and give him a round of applause. Well-done Stan. Can’t wait to hear about your paddleboard adventures. Yes, that’s sarcasm.

4. The peppermint tents are up

Four new plays for the summer of 2014. The curtain rises on June 11th. This summer’s Bard offerings: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “The Tempest,” “Cymbeline” and “Equivocation,” a play by Bill Cain.

3. It’s raining

Rain spells the coming of every season in Vancouver. Remember folks: It’s what keeps it green.

2. The city is full of pink and purple rhododendron bushes

Douglas Coupland remarked that rhododendron green was an official colour in Vancouver. But for these early days of summer, brilliant coloured flowers hide the green. Thank you Ted and Mary Grieg for your marvelous gift to Vancouver.

1. The bike lanes are full

Those empty Vancouver bike lanes that you cursed at all winter are finally full with environmentally friendly commuters. Don’t hate. Join them!

Coupland’s ‘Gumhead’

The Vancouver Art Gallery is bringing a new public art feature to the Robson Square Plaza that relies on public ‘chewing’ interaction. Created by local artist, Douglas Coupland, the piece features a 7-foot tall self-portrait bust of the artist. Temporarily titled ‘gumhead,’ the artwork encourages the public to add their chewing material to the sculpture. The hope being, that in a matter of months, Coupland’s face will be completely covered with a patchwork layer of saliva infused sweet bubble cud.

The gallery has described the piece as “a gum-based, crowd-sourced, publicly interactive, social-sculpture self-portrait.” It is one of fifteen works commissioned by the VAG as part of NEXT: A Series of Artist Projects from the Pacific Rim.

The bust is being installed this week on the grassy knoll of the southeast corner of Robson plaza. The official unveiling will occur on May 31st. The bust will remain at this location until September 1st.

The gumhead will be part of the plaza’s summer theme: Urban Reef. The reef project is the latest winner in the Robson Redux design competition, a contest open to local and foreign designers for re-imagining the public space outside of the VAG, between Hornby and Howe street.

Coupland’s work may have been inspired by other public ‘gum’ works. Anyone who has visited Seattle’s Pike Place Market has probably witnessed the Market Theatre Gum Wall. The wall, located in an alley just behind the market, is a kaleidoscope of used gum that has become an Instagram staple for visitors to the Emerald City. Another public gum work can be found in Berlin, on one of the wall sections from the now dismantled Berlin Wall.

For those hoping to be a part of the project, we suggest a multicoloured, HubbaBubba style, chewing addition. It’ll standout and add a bit of flare to the standard spearmint Dentyne swabs.

The Hollow Tree Gets a Golden Makeover

One of Vancouver’s first tourist attractions was the hollow tree in Stanley Park. It stood out as a symbol of the massive wilderness that surrounded the developing city, a wilderness that has been shrinking ever since.

The tree has had its own official photographer, been spared by rezoning and was reinforced in 2009 by public funding, after the 2006 windstorm threatened its foundation. Now, the hollow tree will be the subject of a new public art exhibit by local artist and author, Douglas Coupland.

Coupland has been commissioned to create a full-scale replica of the infamous tree. His version will be made with steel-reinforced resin and will be coated with a gold patina. The golden stump will stand 13 metres tall and will weigh approximately 16,000 kilograms. The exhibit will also feature a large backdrop of a forest.

The golden tree will be displayed in the plaza of the new MC² development that is being built at the bottom of the Cambie corridor. It is estimated that 100,000 commuters will view the work each day from the Canada Line SkyTrain and vehicular traffic.

The piece is a fair distance from its inspiration, but Coupland hopes the new tree will inspire tourists and locals to seek out the original hollow attraction inside Stanley Park.

The publicly funded exhibit will undoubtedly have its haters, but Coupland hopes the piece will incite a new dialogue on ecology and the importance of forest management. “It shows us what we used to have and what we can have again in the future,” claim Coupland, “if we have a spirit of appreciating nature and if we realize that we are its custodian for better or worse.”

Coupland’s other public artworks in the City of Vancouver include the digital orca at the Vancouver Convention Centre and the Terry Fox Memorial in front of BC Place.

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