Mattress Vancouver

Simmons Mattress Gallery's Blog

Jump For Joy

A fantastic new photomural is on display in Chinatown thanks to the inspiring photography of Eyoälha Baker and the patronage of Murality.org. Titled “Jump for Joy Photo Project,” the piece will be on display for one year at 161 East Pender St., just off of Main Street.

The photo project features 100 images of local Vancouverites in active flight. “Jumping is a natural response to celebrating, excitement and a passion for life,” cites Baker. “I think it is beautiful to capture the energy at the peak of that motion.”

The project is being displayed on the lane wall of a building owned by Amalia Liapis, the founder of Murality.org. The location is less than a block away from the corner of Hastings and Main, one of poorest areas in Canada.

In an area where outward joy is often hard to come by, the public art piece offers a positive image that has been embraced by the community.

“People in the area seem to love it; I had incredible support from people in the area while I was putting it up.”

The mural offers a reason for the public to venture into a neighbourhood that many avoid due to its reputation. The figures remind the viewer that the spirit of life is contained within us all. Sometimes all it takes is a simple jump to express it.

Baker is currently collecting photos from around the world of people bounding towards the skies. She hopes to create a coffee table book with 1,000 jumpers.

Urban Beekeeping

Hives for Humanity is offering free beekeeping lessons every Monday night at the Milross Gardens in Chinatown. The non-profit organization will host weekly workshops from 5 pm to 6:30 pm until the end of the summer. The workshops are open to anyone and include gardening tips, beekeeping care and the opportunity to taste honey fresh from the comb.

The Milross Gardens are located at 989 Main Street, just off of Milross Avenue. The site contains two hives that thrive beside a 6,000 square foot community garden. The garden has 130 raised garden boxes, of which 40 are designated as pollinators. The rest of the boxes are available for lease by Vancouver residents. Two of these are set aside for composting.

While the bees may be attracted to the adjacent flowers, their range can include a radius of 6.5 kilometers. If you live in the Chinatown or Strathcona neighbourhoods, the nectar from your garden could be contributing to the honey being produced in the Milross Gardens.

If your interest lies more in the garden and less on the bees, stop by between 11:00 am and 2:00 pm on Mondays to talk to the garden’s local horticulturalist.

For more information on the Milross Gardens, visit: http://www.milrossgardensonmain.com.

For more info on Hives for Humanity, visit: http://hivesforhumanity.com

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